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Coronavirus: 6 myths and false advice to ignore about covid-19

Coronavirus: 6 myths and false advice to ignore about covid-19


New cases of coronavirus are coming from many countries and there is no known cure for it.

And a series of health tips are emerging on social media, ranging from useless but harmless to the most dangerous.

We have analyzed some of the most widely shared online content and what science has to say about it.

1. Garlic

Many posts that recommend being eaten by garlic to prevent infection are shared on Facebook.

The World Health Organization (WHO) states that although it is "a healthy diet that may contain antibodies," there is no evidence that eating garlic can protect people from the new coronavirus.

In many cases, these remedies do not harm themselves, as long as the evidence is based on evidence. But bullying can have serious consequences.

The South China Morning Post published the story of a woman who had to receive medical treatment at the hospital because her throat was swollen after consuming 1.5 kg of raw garlic.

2. Miracle Minerals

YouTuber Jordan Sather, who has thousands of followers on various platforms, has confirmed that the "amazing mineral supplement", called MMS, can "remove" coronavirus.

It contains chlorine dioxide, a bleaching agent.

Sather and others advocated this before the outbreak of the coronavirus, writing on Twitter that "not only does chlorine dioxide (aka MMS) kill cancer cells, it can also kill coronavirus."

Last year, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned of the health risks of taking MMS. Health officials in other countries also issued warnings.

The FDA states that it does not know of any studies that indicate that these products are safe or effective in treating any disease.

He also warns that drinking them can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and symptoms of severe dehydration.

3. Home-made automatic cleaner

Media outlets around the world have reported shortages of hand sanitizer. Washing your hands is an important way to prevent the spread of infection.

As information was published about the shortage in Italy, home-made gel recipes were repeated on social media.

But these recipes are designed to create a disinfectant and, as scientists have said, are not suitable for use on the skin.

Hand-based alcohol-based gels usually also contain emollients, which make them pleasant to the skin, in addition to a 60-70% alcohol content.

Professor Sally Bloomfield, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, says she does not think it would be an effective product to kill germs on the hands or less if made with vodka, which contains only 40% alcohol.

By cleaning up the area, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says the most common home remedies should work.

4. Colloidal Silver

The use of colloidal silver to combat coronavirus appeared in the exhibition of American evangelist Jim Bakker.

Colloidal silver is made up of tiny particles of liquid-shaped metal.

A guest at the show says that the liquid kills coronavirus bacteria within 12 hours (although he admits it has not been tested on Covid-19).

The idea that it could be an effective treatment for coronavirus is widely shared on Facebook, especially by groups that do not have much confidence in standard medical advice.

But health officials in the US say there is no evidence that this type of silver is effective in treating diseases.

Most importantly, it can cause serious side effects, such as kidney damage, fainting, and argyria, a condition that causes the skin to turn blue.

Some of those who advertised this on social media have found that their posts now present a warning from the reality check service on Facebook.

5. Drink water every 15 minutes

The post, copied and pasted by many Facebook accounts, quotes a "Japanese doctor" who recommends drinking water every 15 minutes to eliminate any germs that may have entered the mouth.

The Arabic version has been distributed more than 250,000 times.

 

Professor Bloomfield says there is no evidence that this applies to anything.

Bacteria from the air enter the body through the respiratory tract as they inhale. Some of them can get into your mouth, but constantly drinking water will not protect you from getting the virus.

However, drinking water and staying hydrated is often the best medical advice.

6. Heat and avoid ice cream

Some tips on social media show that heat kills the virus and recommend anything from drinking hot water to hot showers or using a hair dryer.

The post, copied and pasted by many social media users, and falsely claimed by UNICEF, claims that drinking hot water and sun exposure kills the virus, and that ice cream should be avoided.

Some tips on social media show that heat kills the virus and recommend anything from drinking hot water to hot showers or using a hair dryer.

The post, copied and pasted by many social media users, and falsely claimed by UNICEF, claims that drinking hot water and sun exposure kills the virus, and that ice cream should be avoided.

Once the virus has entered your body, there is no way to kill it - your body has to fight it. 

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